About Shari Lynn

I am reaching the half century mark on this earth and am grateful to be a wife, mother, literacy coach, reader, writer, listener, artist, photographer (kinda), chef (well. . . I could be. . . my husband says I am),  ponderer, thinker, health enthusiast . . . and chronic toe stubber (honestly, this is a problem).

My purpose in life weaves through all of these roles I play.  I am deeply inspired to help others know that they matter. That means YOU.  If you were brought to this page, it’s because you were meant to be here.  Each living soul has been created to share their own gifts with the world and I’m here to tell you – that’s the real you.  In the world’s noise and pressures or what we are expected to be, we can not even find a quiet space to listen to what the messages from the Universe is telling us.  These messages are big.  But, you need to listen.

I’m here to help.  To show you how.  To teach you how.  Through writing, art, poetry and by sharing my own stories.

I’ve been in that place of lostness, of feeling broken, where I lived in a mind that controlled my every move – and I believed that critical mind-voice (I call her Bernice.  She isn’t always BAD, but she can be overbearing.).  It’s a torturous place to live.  I still go there sometimes, but I’ve learned ways to come back home to me.

Every day I am learning and unlearning more about who I am meant to be and how to live my truth and I’m so thankful you are here to join me on this journey so we can learn together.

Shari 🙂

Pondering
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7 thoughts on “About Shari Lynn

  1. ” Being alone in this world of solitude seekers is a difficult place to be”.
    Why ever would you think you are alone? Too much “pondering”? We are here, everywhere, really. The point of intersection just hasn’t been reached yet.
    Or has it………….

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  2. Shari I do understand you saying you are alone. Even though we KNOW in a sense, that isn’t true, it often feels like it. It often feel like aloneness is both blessing and a curse. I love being “alone with myself” actually, as that is when I can truly get in touch with myself and the NOW and the unity of all things. But there is this need for community, for reaching out, which is why we create art/writing in the first place, to get a “response” to make a connection. In REALITY, it is true, we are never “alone” we are joined at our bases like trees with intertwined roots. And our “Higher Power” wraps us all to His/Her breast but the feeling or aloneness if part of the human condition, though we can work on lessening it.

    I had to laugh when you said “constant toe stubber!” I am that and also a “constant ankle twister!” I just did it again on Sunday and my foot looks like a baby pig, and is turning purple and red! This happens to often that it would be comical if it didn’t hurt so much when it happens!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Judi,
      I read your first paragraph five times. You have a gift with words. That paragraph is proof of that. I then, copied it off and pinned it to my wall.

      Aloneness is different than Loneliness. As a solitude seeker in the busyness of this world, I crave aloneness. Being alone feeds me, gives me energy, rejuvenates my being and soul purpose in life because, as you said, we discover more of who we really are when we are alone. Being still. Listening to the whisper of the wind. Noticing that butterfly that lingers in your garden. All are messages from Him.

      Other times, I need community. Again, you are so right in saying that we use our art to connect with others, whether that be writing, art or even talking. Talking is an art you know. But more so that talking, it’s listening to others, which is a true art (and a gift). God is here the most. We are all connected at this soul level. When someone receives us in an open hearted, non-judging and intensely interested way, our spirits expand. It is nothing short of a miracle. Those that have the gift of being able to do that though, sadly, are few. When your world consists of too “few” of these receivers, you venture into the “loneliness”.

      The quest: finding the balance.

      Thank you for finding me. I can see we have deeply rooted souls.

      Shari 🙂

      For me,

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      1. Shari, thanks for this lovely commentary on my comment! You too, have a beautiful way with words, and I hope you keep up your writing and art. Thanks so much for your insights into these questions about aloneness. I just commented on your last post about your sister. Please take it as it was meant, it’s a bit “direct” but that is the way I am! I meant it with love and a sincere desire to help you understand what may be happening. The books i mention I believe would help you so much; by reading what you write, I feel you are “ready” for them. I think they would help you immensely on your current journey. Sending love and blessings your way.

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  3. Hi Shari. I love the fact that you name your critical mind Bernice. That’s a way cool thing to do. I think that would be helpful for me–so thank you. I have been trying to “live my truth”. Even though sometimes I don’t even know what that means. The way you write draws me in immediately. I love that! I’m very grateful to have found you and your authenticity.

    Liked by 1 person

  4. Hi Shari,
    My name’s Jason; I run an ongoing Q&A with fiction writers and readers called Howlarium. I came across your wall on twitter, thought you seemed interesting, and was wondering if I might be able to send you a question sometime. Questions usually aim at the place where writing/reading and life intersect. Think you might be open to something like that?

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