Pie Story #sol16

I don’t like to admit it, but we are pie snobs at my house.  It’s not our fault.  I blame my mother-in-law (or should I say credit?).

Before I even married my husband, I knew that making pie from scratch was going to be an art that I wanted to master.  His mother, you see, had the gift of creating these masterpieces and at the end of many Sunday meals, they would be presented, savored, and devoured.

I was there.  A mere 16-year-old girlfriend.

I saw the look on my husband’s eyes when the pie came out.

I saw the look on my father-in-law’s eyes when the pie came out.

I also saw the family in my husband’s house melt into a blissful state upon tasting that first bite.

And, I saw the love that radiated around the table.

I learned then and there that I would need to figure this pie thing out.  As a new bride, my pies were a sad disappointment. Crust making was torture.  My husband persevered, never criticizing my attempts.  Perhaps he knew he still had his mother’s pies as a default.  Or, maybe he was praying that eventually I would get there.  Really, I think he was just grateful that I was trying.

It’s taken years, and my pie making art is one of the few things I will openly say that I’m pretty good at.  There are days that no matter what, a crust won’t take shape and I’ll throw it in the garbage and start over (or decide to make a box cake instead).  There are days when I can’t find my rolling-pin cover and I have to cut off the toes of a sock to stretch over the pin.  And, there are days when I overcook the apples turning them to applesauce.

But, on those good pie days. . .

oh man. . .

my husband is like putty in my hands.

Shari 🙂

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8 thoughts on “Pie Story #sol16

  1. I wish I was able to try one of these pies, but alas, I doubt they are gluten free and therefore boring 😦
    Anything though that someone spends their life perfecting must be taken in. Skills that are honed in on like this, that have history and are rooted in love are the best. I love the generational, introduction to family spin you put on this:

    “I was there. A mere 16-year-old girlfriend.

    I saw the look on my husband’s eyes when the pie came out.

    I saw the look on my father-in-law’s eyes when the pie came out.

    I also saw the family in my husband’s house melt into a blissful state upon tasting that first bite.

    And, I saw the love that radiated around the table.”

    That is everything right there. Your notes on how to make better, update, improvise – all show care. I find it very comforting that notion. Like warm apple pie, incidentally. This piece reads with rich flavor and warmth.

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  2. your last line made me laugh out loud “my husband is puddy in my hand”
    I love this post and also that you make sure to note that there are still mistakes even though you are very experienced! I wish I could try some of your pie mmmm

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  3. I come from a family where my mom is the pie-making expert. It wouldn’t be Christmas or Thanksgiving without her yummy pies. Good for you for mastering this art. Your pies photos are making me hungry.

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  4. Mmm- your slice was a perfect snippet of family history and love. The pictures were great too. I have never heard of a rolling pin cover- maybe that is just what I need to perfect my crust. I was always a “unroll the refrigerated pie crust” kind of person until I moved where such a thing did not exist. I can make an okay crust, but it is not a skill I practice often enough.

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  5. You are impressive. Like Kristi, my husband is the pie maker. I do crumbles and cobblers. I never had the patience of the crust thing . . . Although, wow, do I love pie! Loved this line after all of the lead up: “I learned then and there that I would need to figure this pie thing out.”

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